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Holocaust Case: Defeat of Denial

Meet the Attorney who Defeated the Holocaust Deniers!
Holocaust Case: Defeat of Denial
Book Launch and Discussion with Author William John Cox 

Sunday July 12th @ 3pm

The Holocaust Case, which ruled the gassing of Jews by Hitler was simply a fact and not reasonably subject to dispute, was featured in the movie, Never Forget, but the real story has never been told. Now, for the first time, the true facts are revealed by William John Cox, the public-interest lawyer who represented a Nazi death camp survivor and sued the radical organizations that denied the Holocaust. In retaliation, Cox was sued for defamation by the reclusive leader of a shadowy consortium that earned millions peddling historical lies and bizarre theories of racial superiority. His recollection of these matters is supplemented by official court records. In a poignant personal memoir, the author details his path from an orphan named Billy Jack to a representative of a secret client in the publication of the suppressed Dead Sea Scrolls. Along his circuitous life path, Cox meets another orphan one who could never forget the extermination of his entire family by the Nazis. The survivor had been taunted by the deniers to prove the truth of the Holocaust. Together, the two accept the challenge and make history. Cox discusses his unconventional practice of law, in which he undertook these landmark cases without charging a fee, and tells why he did it. He derives lessons from the Holocaust and explains how the insights relate to current social and political conditions.

The Holocaust Case, which ruled the gassing of Jews by Hitler was simply a fact and not reasonably subject to dispute, was featured in the movie, Never Forget, but the real story has never been told.

Now, for the first time, the true facts are revealed by William John Cox, the public-interest lawyer who represented a Nazi death camp survivor and sued the radical organizations that denied the Holocaust. In retaliation, Cox was sued for defamation by the reclusive leader of a shadowy consortium that earned millions peddling historical lies and bizarre theories of racial superiority. His recollection of these matters is supplemented by official court records.

In a poignant personal memoir, the author details his path from an orphan named Billy Jack to a representative of a secret client in the publication of the suppressed Dead Sea Scrolls.

Along his circuitous life path, Cox meets another orphan one who could never forget the extermination of his entire family by the Nazis. The survivor had been taunted by the deniers to prove the truth of the Holocaust. Together, the two accept the challenge and make history.

Cox discusses his unconventional practice of law, in which he undertook these landmark cases without charging a fee, and tells why he did it. He derives lessons from the Holocaust and explains how the insights relate to current social and political conditions.

For more than 40 years, William John Cox vigorously pursued a career in law enforcement, public policy and the law. As a police officer, he was an early leader in the "New Breed" movement to professionalize law enforcement. Cox wrote the Policy Manual of the Los Angeles Police Department and the introductory chapters of the Police Task Force Report of the National Advisory Commission on Criminal Justice Standards and Goals, which continues to define the role of the police in America. As an attorney, Cox worked for the U.S. Department of Justice to implement national standards and goals, prosecuted cases for the Los Angeles County District Attorney's Office, and operated a public interest law practice primarily dedicated to the defense of young people. Professionally, Cox volunteered pro bono services in two landmark legal cases. In 1981, representing a Jewish survivor of Auschwitz, he investigated and successfully sued a group of radical right-wing organizations which denied the Holocaust. The case was later the subject of the Turner Network Television motion picture, Never Forget. Cox later represented a "secret" client and arranged the publication of almost 1,800 photographs of ancient manuscripts that had been kept from the public for more than 40 years. A Facsimile Edition of the Dead Sea Scrolls was published in November 1991. His role in that effort is described by historian Neil Asher Silberman in The Hidden Scrolls: Christianity, Judaism, and the War for the Dead Sea Scrolls. Cox retired as a Supervising Trial Counsel for the State Bar of California, where he led a team of attorneys and investigators who targeted the prosecution of attorneys accused of serious misconduct and criminal gangs engaged in the illegal practice of law. Over the years, Cox has written extensively on public policy, politics, philosophy and the human condition.

For more than 40 years, William John Cox vigorously pursued a career in law enforcement, public policy and the law. As a police officer, he was an early leader in the "New Breed" movement to professionalize law enforcement.

Cox wrote the Policy Manual of the Los Angeles Police Department and the introductory chapters of the Police Task Force Report of the National Advisory Commission on Criminal Justice Standards and Goals, which continues to define the role of the police in America.

As an attorney, Cox worked for the U.S. Department of Justice to implement national standards and goals, prosecuted cases for the Los Angeles County District Attorney's Office, and operated a public interest law practice primarily dedicated to the defense of young people.

Professionally, Cox volunteered pro bono services in two landmark legal cases. In 1981, representing a Jewish survivor of Auschwitz, he investigated and successfully sued a group of radical right-wing organizations which denied the Holocaust. The case was later the subject of the Turner Network Television motion picture, Never Forget.

Cox later represented a "secret" client and arranged the publication of almost 1,800 photographs of ancient manuscripts that had been kept from the public for more than 40 years. A Facsimile Edition of the Dead Sea Scrolls was published in November 1991. His role in that effort is described by historian Neil Asher Silberman in The Hidden Scrolls: Christianity, Judaism, and the War for the Dead Sea Scrolls.

Cox retired as a Supervising Trial Counsel for the State Bar of California, where he led a team of attorneys and investigators who targeted the prosecution of attorneys accused of serious misconduct and criminal gangs engaged in the illegal practice of law.

Over the years, Cox has written extensively on public policy, politics, philosophy and the human condition.

Earlier Event: July 12
Pollyllama
Later Event: July 13
Countdown Celebration